About

Cam M. Roberts (28) is an writer & poet from rural North Carolina.
Currently, he works as a pharmaceutical sales rep in Winston-Salem, NC.
Cam earned his BA from WFU ’12, where he studied Theatre & English.
Prior to that, he attended NCSSM ’08.

Cam, spring 2014

Cam, spring 2014

 

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11 thoughts on “About

  1. There was no place to comment under your Feb 18th post, so I thought I’d comment here.

    Very interesting poem. It’s long, but it stays true to the tone – there are no sections that fall flat. I just love that first stanza:

    “Your face, within a certain oblong
    Distance, is catalyzed by a curtained dimness
    of hooded light,
    Seeming in a way cloistered
    like an apprehended simile
    or one too many slurs which
    expose the wreckage of our words
    as they cannot be salvaged”

    I love how you use a simile to talk about a simile. The “oblong” face isn’t circle or square, and is the distance “oblong” as well? Distance is Capitalized, which I am trying to understand. So the light produces a catalysis, a kind of reaction to the light, but the light is hooded so the picture I get is quite different than one of regular light shining on someone’s face. Catalysis is a chemical reaction, so the dim or hooded light actually makes the face … change?
    The face is “cloistered” – secluded or hidden by that hood of dim light, and then this simile – “like an apprehended simile” … apprehended means “fully understood” so does the dim light make the speaker see the face as it really is?

    Very, very interesting. I’d love your explanation!

    • This first stanza is sort of a glimpse into what the future might hold for us all. People say time is measured in seconds, days, moments, increments, etc., while this may be true, I believe time is better measured in light, it’s presence and absence. It’s an attempt to grasp wholeheartedly the mortality it holds over us and the ones we love. We are only conscious of our own mortality, even in our youth, when we bear witness to the mortality of others in their aging, dying, and suffering. The distance from ‘perceiver’ to ‘perceived’ in this case is analogous to those profound moments when you look at someone you love a suddenly have a glimpse of his/her frailty as magnified in the fleeting passage of time, which in turn is catalyzed by the shifting/fading light of day – in the end, it’s really you looking at yourself as refracted in another. The more hidden the face is, the more distant, the more dimly lit, the more mortally defined, and thus the more it evokes the likeness of ourselves in others.

      I hope this helps.
      Thank you for your uplifting words!
      Take Care,
      Cam

    • I’m so sorry I’ve taken so long to respond, Sam! The last few weeks have been crazy – I had so many deadlines all due on the same day last week, which didn’t leave me with hardly any time to write or stay connected.
      I was very much delighted to see your nomination and now I finally have time to get caught up with your resplendent blog! I understand if you can’t or don’t want to re-nominate me.
      Again, I apologize, my friend! Hope you’re doing well, and continue having a wonderful week!

      Take Care,
      Cam .

      • Hi Cam, there is no time limit to the nomination. I am looking forward to your accepting it 😀

        Just go to this link http://bondingtool.wordpress.com/2013/03/15/liebster-blog-award and fulfill the requirements.

        You don’t need to nominate 11 bloggers if you are having trouble naming them. What’s more important is that you feel they deserve more mention and to bring their works to more audience.

        I am so happy you accept the award. You have wonderful works and I can see even from tumblr you have been very busy. Keep inspiring 😀 – Sam

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